Matt C. Abbott
December 3, 2006
Kinsey critic refutes Wikipedia entry
By Matt C. Abbott

Author and researcher Dr. Judith A. Reisman takes issue with large portions of the Wikipedia entry about her. She says that her fully cited corrections made to the entry were immediately deleted.

Also, Wikipedia has chosen not to correct the many blatant falsehoods in its entry, says Dr. Reisman.

The following are some of the "corrected" portions of the entry Dr. Reisman has provided to me:

    Wikipedia deliberately ignored the data on Playboy's use of children, focusing only on Hustler. The systemic findings of child sexual abuse cartoons and illustrations were directly purged by Wikipedia from its pages. In fact, Playboy averaged eight child images per issue (five percent of its cartoons and visuals) and 16 such images per issue during 1971. Most of these images portrayed children in sexual scenarios.

    Wikipedia also states: 'The work which Reisman produced was later denied publication by the American University, where the study was based, after their independent academic auditor reported on it.' Well, no.

    First of all, the president of American University, Richard Berendzen, was convicted shortly thereafter for obscene phone calls of a child sexual abuse nature, while the head of AU's psychology department, Dr. Elliot McGinnies, was arrested for sex with a nine-year-old girl in his trailer park at a nudist colony in Maryland, suggesting the obvious. While I was researching pedophilia and child sexual abuse at AU, there were highly compromised AU administrators who were most anxious to be rid of me.

    Moreover, the only 'independent academic auditor' hired by AU was Dr. Emanuel Landau, who stated: 'This is a sound study, producing high quality data in a complex and difficult area conducted in a scientifically acceptable fashion.' Dr. Landau was also one of my six peer reviewers, and all had defended the study.

    Wikipedia cites Robert Figlio of the University of Pennsylvania, a peer reviewer who belatedly 'changed' his mind. Figlio did not complain to AU (Wikipedia's claim) that the research was bad. Figlio's sudden distress showed up in Playboy. But as Figlio was paid by the U.S. Department of Justice, as one of the peer reviewers, to oversee each methodological step of the two-year study, his tardy charge that '[t]he term child used in the aggregate sense in this report is so inclusive and general as to be meaningless' is false as he well knew.

    Figlio also falsely stated that 'the love scene from Romeo and Juliet [was considered] child porn' (p.116). There is no Romeo and Juliet in this study. The Romeo quote is from a book by pornography apologist Avedon Carol who claims the 'world's foremost researcher in this area' is the (deceased) sex-change guru John Money. Money interviewed in The Journal of Paedophilia advocating sex between men and boys found 'no evidence that pornography causes' harm, according to Avedon. Well then, I'm glad that is settled.

    Wikipedia also wholly distorts the facts regarding my lawsuit against the Kinsey Institute for 'defamation of character' and 'slander.' Go to my Web site at drjudithreisman.com and see 'The Coverup' for full documentation.

    Wikipedia asserts that a reviewer of my book, Kinsey, Sex and Fraud, called it 'at best an inflated political pamphlet.' The reviewer further noted that the arguments in the book were based on 'innuendo, distortion, and selective representation of decontextualised 'facts.'' The source of that citation is William Simon, Kinsey Institute researcher and long time apologist for adult sex with children who also revealed that Kinsey 'used only about a quarter of the [18,000] cases in his two reports.'

Dr. Reisman says the entire Wikipedia entry is riddled with such falsehoods in order to protect Big Pornography and the tax-funded Kinsey Institute.

© Matt C. Abbott

 

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Matt C. Abbott

Matt C. Abbott is a Catholic commentator with a Bachelor of Arts degree in Communication, Media and Theatre from Northeastern Illinois University. He has been interviewed on MSNBC, NPR and WLS-TV in Chicago, and has been quoted in The New York Times and the Chicago Tribune. He can be reached at mattcabbott@gmail.com.

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