Matt C. Abbott
Priest's alleged killer caught; the NFL and the homosexual network
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By Matt C. Abbott
January 3, 2014

On Jan. 1, 2014, Father Eric Freed, a priest of the Diocese of Santa Rosa, was found murdered in his parish rectory. Thankfully, it appears that his killer has been caught. Click here for the details. I'm glad an arrest has been made so quickly in this case.

Incidentally, I still hold out hope for earthly justice in the unsolved 1998 murder of Father Alfred Kunz, a priest of the Diocese of Madison, Wis. Click here for my 2010 column on that case.



Call me conspiratorial, but I find it interesting that in the span of only a few days, an NFL player has been named – by "gay-friendly" media outlets, no less – as being secretly gay (which he's denied); and former Minnesota Vikings punter Chris Kluwe has penned an article published at a tabloid sports website alleging that he was released by the team due to his vocal support of same-sex marriage.

From ESPN.com (excerpted; click here to read the story in its entirety):
    Former Minnesota Vikings punter Chris Kluwe alleged in a Deadspin story that he was released before the season as a result of being outspoken in support of same-sex marriage and was a victim of homophobic remarks by Vikings special teams coordinator Mike Priefer....

    According to Kluwe's piece, which was posted Thursday and titled 'I was an NFL player until I was fired by two cowards and a bigot,' Priefer criticized the punter throughout the 2012 season for his support of same-sex marriage, allegedly saying in a November team meeting that 'we should round up all the gays, send them to an island and nuke it until it glows.'

    Priefer released a statement Thursday night, denying Kluwe's allegations.

    'I want to be clear that I do not tolerate discrimination of any type and am respectful of all individuals,' Priefer said. 'I personally have gay family members who I love and support just as I do any family member.... The comments today have not only attacked my character and insulted my professionalism, but they have also impacted my family. While my career focus is to be a great professional football coach, my number one priority has always been to be a protective husband and father to my wife and children....'

    Kluwe also wrote that [Rick] Spielman texted him and called him in February, asking him to stop tweeting about the resignation of Pope Benedict XVI because angry fans were calling the Vikings' offices....
Hmm. I take it that Kluwe's tweets about Pope Benedict were less than favorable. Very unfortunate, but not surprising.

Regarding the NFL player who's said to be gay, even if he is – and, again, he's denied it – there's no reason, morally speaking, to make public his sins. In fact, it seems to me that doing so is committing the sin of detraction (on the part of the person who might have engaged in sinful activity with the player in question). Since no misconduct is alleged, there's no just cause involved in revealing that which is hidden.

Not that gay activists care a wit about sin – unless, of course, it's the sin of "homophobia."

As for Chris Kluwe, it sounds like sour grapes to me. Now, if it turns out that the special teams coordinator did in fact make the aforementioned remarks – and I emphasize if – then, yes, it was an awful thing to say. But forgive me if I don't regard Kluwe as a victim. He's not.

Heck, it appears that Canadian sportscaster Damian Goddard, a practicing Catholic, was more of a victim (of corporate political correctness run amok) than Kluwe (of the supposedly bigoted and cowardly Vikings' coaching staff).

Perhaps the gay activists are still miffed that their media campaign against Phil Robertson of Duck Dynasty essentially backfired.

Drama queens kings.

On a related note, Pope Francis does indeed oppose gay adoption. Check it out.

© Matt C. Abbott

 

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Matt C. Abbott

Matt C. Abbott is a Catholic commentator with a Bachelor of Arts degree in communication, media and theatre from Northeastern Illinois University. He also has an Associate in Applied Science degree in business management from Triton College. He's been interviewed on MSNBC, Bill Martinez Live, WOSU Radio in Ohio, the Milwaukee Journal Sentinel's 'Unsolved' podcast, WLS-TV (ABC) in Chicago, WMTV (NBC) and WISC-TV (CBS) in Madison, Wis., and has been quoted in The New York Times and the Chicago Tribune. He can be reached at mattcabbott@gmail.com.

(Note: I welcome thoughtful feedback and story ideas. If you want our correspondence to remain confidential, please specify as such in your initial email to me. However, I reserve the right to forward and/or publish emails that are accusatory, insulting or threatening in nature, even if those emails are marked confidential. Also, if you give me permission to publish a quote of yours, please do not contact me at a later time to request that I delete your name. Only in limited circumstances will I quote anonymous sources. Thank you and God bless!)

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