James Lambert
Time's special edition censors George Washington's religious beliefs
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By James Lambert
April 2, 2012

Late last year, Time Magazine released a 96-page "special edition" on the life of George Washington, entitled George WashingtonHow the Great Uniter Helped Create the United States. The edition (still available on news stands until April 6, 2012) was written by Richard Lacayo. The publication is filled with a lot of valuable facts, yet it excluded an important part of Washington's persona — his strong belief in God. In fact, a number of historians continue to censor Washington's faith. Whether this is intentional or not — who knows?

Washington's faith was an integral part of his make-up. It wasn't unusual for him to include reference to his Creator in his numerous letters to friends, associates, and relatives during his lifetime. In researching my book www.16AmazingStories.com, I had access to a private library in La Jolla, California, that had in its possession over 200 personal letters from Washington. The original formation of our country occurred during a very fragile time. Washington recognized that America's fight for freedom during that period in history was in the hands of a sovereign God.

Much of our early settlers' motivation to start a new country was to escape the religious tyranny they experienced in Europe. Remember the Pilgrims? Washington once said "the hand of Providence (had) been conspicuous" in the formation of our country. Lest we forget too that "all of the 56 signors of the Declaration of Independence, except two, were members of Christian churches which included the Anglican, Congregational, Episcopalian, Presbyterian, Catholic and Unitarian denominations. Additionally, four of the signors were current or fulltime ministers."

As for Washington, he was a member of the Pohick Church in Virginia when the Declaration was signed. He often had to travel over 3 hours just to get to church in Virginia. While President, he regularly attended church in New York and Philadelphia (depending on where he lived). His Christian faith was a part of who he was. For Time Magazine to exclude this fact in their "special edition" publication was unfortunate. Washington's friend and future Supreme Court Chief Justice, John Jay, said, "Washington was a sincere believer in the Christian faith."

There are some historians who would say that the Masons had an influence on Washington's life. Actually the contrary is true. The Masons had minimal influence on our first President. Washington only attended 29 of their meetings during his lifetime. Further, the Masonic Lodge in America during the 1700s was fundamentally a Christian social organization. That all changed after Washington's death and during the early 1800s, when the influence of the Illuminati began to dominate this group.

Numerous sources substantiating our first President's Christian faith are quoted in my newly released book (www.16AmazingStories.com ). Sadly, it seems that the mainstream media such as Time Magazine and some in academic circles will tell you different. The people who were the closest to our first President knew different.

Clearly, the first-hand observations by Washington's friends, associates, and relatives should disprove much of the left's contention that Washington was, for the most part, secular in his beliefs.

© James Lambert

 

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James Lambert

James Lambert has a broad business background. After receiving his undergraduate degree from Linfield College (McMinnville, Oregon), Lambert pursued a career in banking by working in various management capacities for Crocker Bank, San Diego Trust & Savings Bank and First Interstate Bank (between 1973 and 1995). By 1990 Lambert received his Master in Business Administration from National University (San Diego). For 3 years, Lambert also taught Finance at Mira Costa Community College... (more)

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