Matt C. Abbott
October 13, 2013
Canonization for a Jesuit exorcist?
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By Matt C. Abbott

    "There are some priests who, when they read this Gospel passage, this and others, say: 'But, Jesus healed a person with a mental illness.' They do not read this, no? It is true that at that time, they could confuse epilepsy with demonic possession; but it is also true that there was the devil! And we do not have the right to simplify the matter, as if to say: 'All of these (people) were not possessed; they were mentally ill.' No! The presence of the devil is on the first page of the Bible, and the Bible ends as well with the presence of the devil, with the victory of God over the devil....

    "And we can ask ourselves the question: Do I guard myself, my heart, my feelings, my thoughts? Do I guard the treasure of grace? Do I guard the presence of the Holy Spirit in me? Or do I let go, feeling secure, believing that all is going well? But if you do not guard yourself, he who is stronger than you will come. But if someone stronger comes and overcomes, he takes away the weapons in which one trusted, and he shall divide the spoil. Vigilance! Three criteria! Do not confuse the truth. Jesus fights the devil: first criterion. Second criterion: he who is not with Jesus is against Jesus. There are no attitudes in the middle. Third criterion: vigilance over our hearts because the devil is astute. He is never cast out forever. It will only be so on the last day
    ."

    Pope Francis, Oct. 11, 2013


Here's one name I haven't heard mentioned in regard to possible canonization, yet it seems he'd be a good candidate: Father William S. Bowdern, S.J.

Father Bowdern, who was born in 1897 and died in 1983, was the chief exorcist in the 1949 exorcism of "Robbie," the teenaged boy whose case inspired William Peter Blatty's 1971 novel The Exorcist, which subsequently was made into a feature film. The exorcism of "Robbie" took place largely in St. Louis, Mo.

Interestingly, Father Bowdern, who had authored a booklet titled Problems of Courtship and Marriage (1944), reportedly suffered somewhat debilitating effects from the exorcism, although it wasn't something that was publicized.

One Jesuit told me years ago that Father Bowdern had been seen stumbling down the hallway in the mornings prior to celebrating Mass. A Jesuit who witnessed this was understandably concerned, thinking it might have been alcohol-related. He went to his superior, who told him that Father Bowdern had been involved in an exorcism, and this "stumbling" was an effect of having (successfully) performed the exorcism. After celebrating Mass, Father Bowdern was fine.

I asked two individuals who are very knowledgeable of the 1949 exorcism – Thomas B. Allen, author of the book Possessed, and Saint Louis University archivist John Waide – if they've ever heard Father Bowdern's name mentioned as a candidate for canonization. Both responded that they haven't.

At any rate, it's something to consider.

On a related note, there was an interesting interview conducted some years ago by Catholic author and journalist Michael Brown of SpiritDaily.com with Father Walter Halloran, S.J. Father Halloran, who died in 2005, was at the time of the exorcism a Jesuit scholastic and had assisted Father Bowdern for a significant portion of the exorcism.
    SD: Father, how many times were you present in the exorcism sessions?

    Father Halloran: I suppose every night for three weeks.

    SD: Did you have any insight into the origin of the problem?

    Father Halloran: In a way he was a victim to the frame of mind of the aunt (who was into spiritualism).

    SD: What happened at the end? We're told the Archangel Michael manifested.

    Father Halloran: I was taken off five days before the conclusion, but from what I understand there was a very loud sound, a boom – sort of like a sonic boom – and then the boy opened his eyes and said St. Michael came and that it was over. At the same time this took place there were about six or seven priests over in the college church saying their office and there was a huge boom over there and the whole church was completely lit up. Father Bowdern, who was doing the exorcism, and the boy were at the rectory. There was a very, very bright light that lit up the whole church.

    SD: What were the most striking physical phenomena that you witnessed yourself during the exorcisms?

    Father Halloran: I think the markings on the boy's body. I didn't think there was any way they could have been self-induced, the marks, the scratches, the words, the numbers and that sort of thing that appeared in blood red. When the evil spirit took over the child, there seemed to be nothing he could do about it. There were a couple of times when something very dangerous might have happened and he had no recollection whatsoever of anything that took place when he was in one of these sieges. And that affected me, the power that someone or something has over someone.

    SD: Did you see anything fly across the room or furniture move?

    Father Halloran: Yeah. The first night I was there I was kneeling at the bed on which the boy was lying and the bed started going up and down and then I just about got hit with a holy water bottle that was sitting on the dresser and came flying across the room and just missed me by an inch or two.

    SD: How high was the bed going?

    Father Halloran: Oh, I'd say eight inches.
Click here to read the interview in its entirety.

All in all, it's a fascinating case.

Our Lady of Fatima, pray for us.

© Matt C. Abbott

 

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Matt C. Abbott

Matt C. Abbott is a Catholic commentator with a Bachelor of Arts degree in communication, media and theatre from Northeastern Illinois University. He's been interviewed on MSNBC, NPR, WLS-TV (ABC) in Chicago, WMTV (NBC) in Madison, Wis., and has been quoted in The New York Times and the Chicago Tribune. He can be reached at mattcabbott@gmail.com.


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