Bryan Fischer
Islam is a religion of violence: Gen. Petraeus says so
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By Bryan Fischer
September 6, 2010

Pastor Terry Jones intends to burn copies of the Qur'an at his church on 9/11. It's not something I would do were I still in the pastorate, and not something I recommend.

So far the ACLU, which will defend anybody, anywhere, at anytime who puts a torch to the American flag, has been conspicuously silent in defending Rev. Jones' right to free expression.

But the response to Rev. Jones' plan proves something we have been saying from the beginning: Islam is a religion of violence, not a religion of peace.

And the critics of Rev. Jones and the supporters of Islam don't even seem to realize how they are damning Islam all the while they claim to be defending it.

Gen. Petraeus is Exhibit A. According to the Wall Street Journal, he says the burning of Qur'ans by Jones' Florida church "could put the lives of American troops in danger."

Says Petraeus:

"It could endanger troops and it could endanger the overall effort. It is precisely the kind of action the Taliban uses and could cause significant problems. Not just here, but everywhere in the world we are engaged with the Islamic community."

Well, how can this be? How can American lives be endangered by doing nothing more than putting a match to pieces of paper, if Islam is a religion of peace and moderation? How can this be?

When atheists and secularists like the minions of the ACLU, get the Bible banned from schools what do Christians do? They make phone calls, send emails, and go to court. What do Muslims do under similar circumstances? They start shooting and throwing bombs.

Notice as well that nobody is asking what Muslims might have done that ticked off Rev. Jones, how the Muslim world may in fact to blame for his little demonstration. Nobody is out there saying that Muslim policies are "an accessory" to his bonfire, or he is "made in the Muslim world" because of Islamic attacks against America. Nope.

Islam has defenders galore, all eager to excuse Muslim violence against Americans on the grounds that Muslims have been provoked by the West. But when Rev. Jones does nothing more than commit violence against a dead tree, he has nary a defender to say that Muslim provocation is to blame.

Upon hearing of Rev. Jones' plan, hundreds of Afghan protesters shouted "death to America" at a really in Kabul. And they threw rocks at a passing military convoy, just to make clear that their intentions are entirely peaceful.

The Wall Street Journal adds:

    Gen. Petraeus declined to elaborate on precisely what kinds of threats or violence could occur in the wake of such a demonstration. But westerners in Afghanistan have been warned away from restaurants and other public places as tensions arise over the matter.

Okay. "Violence could occur" and Americans have been warned to stay away from the local Denny's in Afghanistan, because you might get blown to pieces in the middle of your Grand Slam breakfast. Nope, nothing alarming here.

Think back to the time at Guantanamo Bay when an entirely false rumor circulated that a Gitmo guard had flushed a Qur'an down a toilet. Riots broke out all over the Muslim world.

The outbreak of violence in the wake of the Gitmo Qur'an episode was exceeded only by the violent riots of Christians all over the U.S. when the Ten Commandments were removed from classrooms in 1980. The carnage, the looting of buildings, the firebombing of cars, the attacks on police, the death of innocent civilians, threatened the stability of the American Republic. Oh wait. Didn't happen.

But then we're not talking here about the religion of peace, are we? The Journal helpfully concludes, "Officials fear that video of a (sic) members of Mr. Jones's church burning of Qurans could set off similar violence and stepped up attacks against U.S. troops."

Hmm. A third mention in one short article of "violence" and "attacks against U.S. troops." Looks like the ones who are hijacking Islam are the ones who want us to believe it is a religion of peace. D'ya think?

(Unless otherwise noted, the opinions expressed are the author's and do not necessarily reflect the views of the American Family Association or American Family Radio.)

© Bryan Fischer

 

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