Dan Popp
Al Gore's upside-down abolitionism
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By Dan Popp
August 6, 2017

FREEDOM IS SLAVERY – George Orwell, 1984

The most obvious truth is that some people cannot see obvious truth. When a man or a woman rejects God, something happens in the brain. Reason and self-awareness seem to fly out the window. Al Gore is not alone in his self-inflicted derangement, but he's the planet's most famous example.

Others have written entire books about Gore's bad science, failed prophecies and weapons-grade hypocrisy. I'm going to try to stay "on point" here. My only task is to unravel Gore's comparison of climate alarmism to abolitionism. He said:
    The abolition of slavery. Women's suffrage and women's rights. The civil rights movement and the anti-apartheid movement in South Africa. The late Nelson Mandela said it was always impossible until it was done. The movement to stop the toxic phase of the nuclear arms race and more recently the gay rights movement. Some of you may disagree with that. I don't. I did earlier in my life. But all of these movements have one thing in common. They all have met with ferocious resistance....
Wow. I guess we're not supposed to remember that the "ferocious resistance" to the abolition of slavery came from Al Gore's party. American slaves were freed literally over the dead bodies of Democrats. We're supposed to lobotomize ourselves into believing that Gore's party was for the Civil Rights Act of 1964, not threatening to filibuster it, as it had blocked all previous civil rights legislation.

Al Gore's metaphor is fractured into tiny fragments upon the slightest examination. Abolitionism was a movement of Christians – the same kind of Christians now mocked as the "religious right." The spiritual descendants of Harriet Beecher Stowe are today enslaved to "bake the cake!" against their will. "Ferocious resistance" to righteousness could be the unofficial motto of the basement-dwelling "Social Justice Warriors" of Gore's stripe.

There are two much better modern equivalents to the anti-slavery cause of the 19th Century. The first is the struggle to save the unborn. Pro-aborts defend their indefensible practices with arguments borrowed from antebellum slaveholders: It's not a person. And if it is a person it is a much lesser person, undeserving of human rights. There's your nearly perfect metaphor for chattel slavery. Al Gore and his camp are on the "ferocious resistance" side of that battle, not the side of the enlightened moral crusaders.

The second contemporary analog for slavery is not actually a metaphor – it is real slavery. It's the forced transfer of the labor of some (taken through the income tax) to the benefit of others (in so-called "welfare" programs). Somehow it's hard for me to imagine Gore or any barbarian manning the barricades to repeal the 16th Amendment, or to end federal handouts. Once again Gore and his kind are not the abolitionists, but the slavers.

But Al Gore isn't just preaching metaphorical slavery or government slavery while invoking the spirit of abolitionism. Gore is the foremost advocate of the most comprehensive plan of enslavement ever devised by humans.

The climate alarmist's answer to every drop of rain is what? Transfer money from those who produce value, to...somewhere else. Carbon banks or third-world governments or bird-blender manufacturers or the UN or dolphins or something. You're not supposed to ask where the money goes or how it would help.

The point is: You work, Master takes.

This attempt to enslave mankind using scary apocalyptic visions is Al Gore's game. He's the high priest of Gaia-Worship-For-Dummies. And he can stand on his biodegradable soapbox and scream all he wants to about how he's just like Frederick Douglass, but we see. The obvious is not opaque to us, Reverend Gore. You are the slaver, the self-righteous denier of human rights, the moral relativist, the snake oil salesman, the greedy, selfish, damnable hypocrite.

We see.

© Dan Popp

 

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