R.T. Neary
Boston Globe's anti-Catholic bias on the rise
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By R.T. Neary
November 14, 2011

The Boston Globe's long-standing animus for the core mission of Roman Catholicism has become even more transparent. It is clearly evident in the spin the paper has applied to the assumption of all the assets of the 6-hospital Caritas Christi Health Care System by a for-profit secular entity, created by the Cerberus venture capital company

The 148-year-old Roman Catholic hospital system of the Archdiocese of Boston is in line to be totally secularized in 2 years with a payment of 25 million dollars to a designated charity. Abortions could be advertised and performed in hospitals with names such as St. Elizabeth's, Holy Family and Good Samaritan.

While the Boston Globe reported the facts of this sale without the clear implications, the paper parroted the statements of Caritas officials that the system was in dire financial condition in 2010. Even though Caritas had earned over 30 million dollars in FY2009, the Globe epitomized them with words such as "struggling" and depicted them as unable to continue operations without a takeover.

Opponents to the sale, maintaining that Caritas was in sound financial condition, formed the Coalition To Save Catholic Health Care in July 2010. Coalition supporters testified at every governmental level with arguments that deception, trickery and lies were involved — and that the fiduciary trust due to donors was being violated.

The whole scenario was fraught with conflicts of interest and hand-in-glove relationships, rather than due diligence. It lacked thorough governmental or media research on Caritas officials' pronouncements that they could not survive financially.

The Boston Globe's reporting became very selective, helping to grease the tracks through the Attorney General's regional meetings, hearings by the Department of Public Health and right up to the Supreme Judicial Court.

After approval and the transfer of assets in November 2010, yet still without any figures for FY2010 which ended on Sept 30, 2010, the Globe's coverage was carefully nuanced, as is their style.

In 2009 Caritas CEO Dr. Ralph de la Torre had run a fundraiser in his home for Attorney General Martha Coakley, with he and his wife contributing their maximum total of $9,600 in her failed bid to fill the seat of deceased U. S. Senator Edward M. Kennedy. Also in 2010 CEO de la Torres, an Obamacare advocate, hosted President Barrack Obama in his home with a fundraiser which raised over $900,000 for the Democratic Senatorial Campaign Committee.

Although the Globe reported on these events, they subsequently failed to give coverage to the required audit, which was being undertaken by the reputable firm Ernst and Young LLC. As it turned out, the independent audit results were publicly delayed for over 11 months before eventually becoming available on the AG's website.

The reason for the reportorial silence since then is quite clear. Ernst and Young's audit figures were in stark disagreement with the story told throughout the proceedings by Caritas officials and echoed by the Boston Globe. For example, Caritas had over $24 million in net income for FY2010. When combined with over $30 million in earnings for FY2009, the audit pictured a hospital system on a sound financial footing.

Back in 2002, the Globe published its Spotlight Team revelations about the predator homosexual priests in the Archdiocese. Once the nature of the abuses became evident, however, they spun the expose into what they labeled a pedophile story, dropping any homosexual references. Yet, the independent John Jay School of Criminal Justice study showed over three quarters of these crimes were perpetrated on post-pubescent males. Homosexual rape did not fit the Boston Globe agenda. Pedophilia did.

The Archdiocese of Boston has suffered severe wounds during the last decade following the expose, and the Boston Globe is winning the battle in its effort to turn the Church's organizational structure into a ceremonial entity — a hollow one that has lost its historically true mission.

Caritas Christi (the loving care of Christ) connotes the core of the 2-millenia-old Christian message. To allow the concept to be sold for 30 pieces of silver (25 million dollars) is to take blood money. Thousands of faithful departed, as well as countless progeny still unborn, will literally be treated like human waste. And a summer of Sunday Mass readings from the Gospel of Matthew in 2011 about the healing power of the Founder has to seem like fantasy without any exemplary value for our lives.

As the bellwether of the mainstream media in the New England area, the spinmeisters in the Boston Globe editorial room are surely congratulating themselves. They operate with an agenda, and it's based on the principle that if something is not reported, in the public's eye it is of miniscule value. But despite the inordinate delay of the last full year's Caritas Christi figures and an attempt to conceal the audit's existence, truth must and will prevail.

This story must be told until a full independent investigation ensues.

© R.T. Neary

 

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